Deadline

Monday, January 29, 2007

Google Ad Sense made too much sense:

My friend from college's father died last month. He wrote about the last day with his father and how much he meant to him. I met his father a few times and knew my buddy always wanted his dad's approval and that he's dad was always beeming with pride when I saw them together. To read that his father called him out of the blue a month before his sudden death to tell him how much he loved him was amazing.

It was good to read that his entire family, including ex-wives and step parents were there bedside for his last moments.

The comment section was filled with readers of his blog and friends wishing him well and telling stories of their own loss. It was really touching to see people open up about their private pain like that. It gave them a chance to share this experience with someone.

Just before the comment section was a "Google Ads" banner with a link to sympathy cards. Way to go. The Google Ads is supposed to have some great spy like technology that can sense what the blog is about and then try to sell someone the reader would be interested in.

1 comment:

Paul Schembri said...

This reminds me of when my own father died suddenly in 2005. He was a motorcyclist with a passion for safety. He came to my house one gorgeous morning in October just to say hello. I was on my way to work, but I had a few minutes to chat. Right before he left to go to my mother in law's house to do her a favor, he paused and gave me a look that I interpreted as pride in the fact that I was his youngest, and I had a family of my own and was his last person to make sure did OK. I thought that he was thinking to himself that his job on earth was fulfilled and everything from here on out was gravy. Hours later, my wife and I left our doctor's office after hearing our second child's heartbeat for the first time via sonogram. I missed a call from my sister and when I called her back she told me to go to the hospital and that she was sure Dad had not survived an accident on his bike.

The greatest feeling that I had about this tragedy was that I had seen him that day and had that moment where we both shared some mutual respect. My wife's father died when she was 9 and she also told me how important it was to remember the last time she saw him alive.

Two other things helped ease the pain of his sudden loss. First was the fact that he died suddenly with no suffering. That was my father's #1 fear- being a drain or burden on someone else while you are helpless. Second, the throngs of people that showed up for his funeral meant so much to me and my family. People were lined up outside the funeral home for hours in the rain to pay their respects. I had no idea how many people were affected by the passing of my father. I always thought he was just a guy who liked to talk too much. I realized at the funeral how many people actually cared about what he was saying all the time.
So for anyone who reads this, make an effort to express your love or try to tell anyone you care about how you feel as often as you can. Even if it isn't because you fear their unexpected death, it will make you feel better by doing this.

Paul